Are your customer interaction channels working together in harmony?

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September 6th, 2011

Remember the "good old days" when if you wanted to interact with a customer you had a meeting, made a phone call from your office, or sent a letter?

Well, those days are gone obviously. Starting with email in the 1980s, then fax, mobile phones, chat, SMS and now social media -- we keep adding new and mostly electronic channels. Why? To provide more convenient service and, let's be honest, to cut costs. E-channels are much cheaper than agents on the phone or other human-assisted channels.

Sadly, all too often, interactions aren't coordinated across channels, leading to customers repeating themselves as they move between channels. And now we have social channels (e.g. Twitter for customer service) to further complicate things.

In a study of  "considered purchases" with US consumers, I found that 70% of large enterprises admitted they don't remember customer information from one touchpoint to the next. And nearly 80% of consumers reported that information had to be repeated during complex (multi-touch) experiences. Consumers that had to interact with companies suffering from this "touchpoint amnesia" …

* were 50% less likely to recommend that company.

* Had purchases rates 24% to 35% lower

One company found their poorly designed IVR forced customers to call an agent. That’s a double whammy because it degraded the customer experience AND wasted agent time. Not a good idea in this economy.

Are you conducting your multi-channel experience with all channels working together in harmony? If not, maybe it's time to figure out just what those sour notes are costing you. I’ll be talking more about customer experience, social media and channel orchestration  in an upcoming series of executive breakfasts.

Join us to learn how to create differentiated customer experience that will cause customers to buy from you, and not your competitors.

Register here: http://solutions.nice.com/breakfast/.

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